Understanding Western Cape election results

Cape Town, May 9, 2019 – The Democratic Alliance looks set to retain the Western Cape. They have received just over 54 percent of votes counted in the province so far. Tracking developments for us from the IEC’s Western Cape results centre is reporter, Pheladi Sethusa.

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DA has taken lead in Cape Town

Cape Town, May 9, 2019 – Reporter Pheladi Sethusa is in the Mother City for us as counting of the Western Cape votes continues. Courtesy #DStv403

Practical, fun apps to help you vote

Screen grabbed photo's of the IEC SA app, available for download on both Play Store and App Store.
Screen grabbed photo’s of the IEC SA app, available for download on both Play Store and App Store.

NOTE: Article first appeared in The Citizen newspaper on May 6, 2014. 

While  some have criticised political parties of not doing enough on social media to campaign for the elections, the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) has two different apps in place to help voters through the electoral process.

The Citizen downloaded the apps to their level of usefulness. The fun app, “IXSA” (I vote South Africa) is a 3D digital game that will require 62.64 megabytes of data to download. But that’s all forgotten once you start playing. There are three different missions, with challenges in each to complete. Using a virtual rotary dial you move your 3D avatar around to get to each challenge.

That’s when all the fun begins – you have to get your avatar from their home to a voting station and cast your ballot successfully. The game is a simulation created to take voters through the process in a fun and interactive way. If you have ever played Sims, you will enjoy it.

The practical “IEC SA” app is available for download on Android’s Play Store and Apple’s App Store for a data friendly 4.06 megabytes. The app provides users with access to their voting details.

Along with this, the app lets users find alternate voting stations, look up previous election national and provincial results and a frequently asked questions tab to answer any questions voters may have. It’s an easy to use way of getting important personal information.

Anyone with a smartphone or tablet can be up-to-date with election results and processes at the swipe of a finger.

Another row engulfs IEC’s Tlakula

FILE PICTURE: Pansy Tlakula Chair of the Independent Electoral Commission. Picture: Tracy Lee Stark
FILE PICTURE: Pansy Tlakula Chair of the Independent Electoral Commission. Picture: Tracy Lee Stark

NOTE: Article first appeared in The Citizen newspaper on April 29, 2014.

Another row has erupted featuring IEC boss Pansy Tlakula.

This time Tlakula, who is facing an Electoral Court hearing today, has been accused of using taxpayers’ money to pay her legal fees.

Bantu Holomisa, United Democratic Movement (UDM) president, said yesterday: “We have received information that the chief electoral officer, Mr Mosotho Moepya, has allegedly paid R500 000 from the IEC’s coffers to pay for Advocate Tlakula’s legal fees.”

The Electoral Court is set to sit in Johannesburg today to hear an application for her removal as chairperson of the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) by the Multi-Party Forum.

Tlakula was found to be involved in the irregular R320 million lease of IEC Riverside Office Park building in Centurion. These findings came from a forensic investigation by PriceWaterhouseCoopers as sanctioned by the Treasury, and another by Public Protector Thuli Madonsela. Holomisa said two separate and “credible organisations have fingered this person as having done irreparable damage”.
Tlakula insists she was not accused of corruption.

Tlakula had lodged papers to review and set aside the findings and recommendations against her with the Pretoria High Court in her personal capacity, said Holomisa. In a statement yesterday Holomisa questioned “on what basis was such a large amount paid even before the review has commenced?”